The Complex Music of Miles Davis Revisited

Send this Page to X1:

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Mr. Wynton Marsalis paid tribute to Mr. Miles Davis in Philadelphia.

Flood the Drummer® On Demand!
Music
Center City
May 16, 2016
By Flood the Drummer
Jazz at Lincoln Center

 

 

 

#TUNEIN to #THEWEEKTHATWAS w/ @FloodTheDrummer every Friday @ 6:00pm on @900am WURD! CLICK HERE to read Techbook Online's stories from 5/9-5/13.

#TUNEIN to #THEWEEKTHATWAS w/ @FloodTheDrummer every Friday @ 6:00pm on @900am WURD! CLICK HERE to read Techbook Online’s stories from 5/9-5/13.

FREE DOWNLOAD: TABS VOL 2, EDI 2!

FREE DOWNLOAD: TABS VOL 2, EDI 2!

 

 

By Christopher “Flood the Drummer®” Norris

5.16.16: Philadelphia – (Entertainment): Of the many drummers I’ve seen perform throughout my life – I began playing drums at age 6, became a professional and recorded my first project while in high school and, in my late teens, managed a Guitar Center drum department where I was responsible for, among many things, organizing the annual ‘Drum-Off’ competition – Mr. Ali Jackson of the Lincoln Center Orchestra, who along with Mr. Wynton Marsalis yesterday paid tribute to jazz great Miles Davis at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Center City Philadelphia, was the most dynamic in terms of tonality and finesse.

At times, it seems as if his wooden drumsticks were actually pencils: he’s so light-handed that he barely had to touch his tightly-tuned tom-toms to get them to respond with melody. And then there were moments – like during a phenomenal drum solo towards the end of the evening – where Mr. Jackson, who arranged at least two songs performed last night by the orchestra in the Verizon Hall, sounded as if he were playing with tree barks.

But Mr. Jackson wasn’t the only show-stopper. In fact, many of the musicians on-stage – like Mr. Dan Nimmer on piano or trombonist Mr. Elliot Mason – were compelling acts. Though Mr. Marsalis, who at the Kimmel Center in November of 2015 received the Marian Anderson Award, is usually the head-liner, when apart of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, he’s one of 15 of the finest jazz soloists and ensemble players in the country, and maybe even the world.

 

 (Article continued below. CLICK HERE  for more info on promotional opportunities)

CLICK HERE to read "Why Philadelphia Should Memorialize the 1985 Move Bombing.'

CLICK HERE to read “Why Philadelphia Should Memorialize the 1985 Move Bombing.’

CLICK HERE to read "What Stop-and-Frisk Critics Want to Hear from Philly’s Mayor."

CLICK HERE to read “What Stop-and-Frisk Critics Want to Hear from Philly’s Mayor.”

CLICK HERE to read "Philadelphia City Council and the Issue of Stop and Frisk."

CLICK HERE to read “Philadelphia City Council and the Issue of Stop and Frisk.”

CLICK HERE to read "Why Toy Guns Aren’t Toys."

CLICK HERE to read “Why Toy Guns Aren’t Toys.”

CLICK HERE to read "City Confirms Reducing Overall Stops Not Priority of Police Reform."

CLICK HERE to read “City Confirms Reducing Overall Stops Not Priority of Police Reform.”

The aforementioned collective throughout the night revisited favorites from Mr. Davis’ grand body of work, including ‘My Funny Valentine,’ which featured on trumpet Mr. Marcus Printup, and a jazz rock tune titled ‘Selim,’ which is Miles spelled backwards.

“Miles made the complex simple and the simple cool,” said Mr. Jackson, who, indeed, played rhythms that despite being syncopated and sometimes hard to count appeared effortlessly.

Mr. Davis this month would have been 90 years old. In 2006, Mr. Davis, who died in 1991, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as “one of the key figures in the history of jazz.” A 2015 movie starring Mr. Don Cheadle titled ‘Miles Ahead’ is an exploration of the trumpeter’s life and music.

Among Mr. Davis’ collaborators were Mr. John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and Mr. Charles Mingus, an American jazz bassist who died in 1979.

Beyond being a jazz virtuoso, Mr. Davis had another gift, which was, according to Mr. Jackson, his ability to “find talent.”

 

 

**Techbook Online is now available in Apple News! Search for ‘Techbook Online’ and add the channel!**

FREE DOWNLOAD: TABS VOL 2, EDI 2!

FREE DOWNLOAD: TABS VOL 2, EDI 2!

   

Thanks for reading. Until next time, I’m Flood the Drummer® & I’m Drumming for JUSTICE!™

Support quality journalism, donate! Your contribution at any level is greatly appreciated.

 

 

About Christopher “Flood the Drummer®” Norris

Christopher A. Norris is an award-winning journalist, online content producer and professional drummer currently serving as the CEO of Techbook Online, a news and event company.

Christopher A. Norris is an award-winning journalist, online content producer and professional drummer currently serving as the CEO of Techbook Online, a news and event company.

About Techbook Online Corporation®:

Reaching million of people across channels and platforms, Techbook Online Corporation (TBO Inc), a 2015 Echoing Green Black Male Achievement Fellowship, publishes socially relevant content that informs, engages, educates, and empowers communities. For more information visit www.techbookonline.com.

Techbook Online, a news and event company that everyday publishes original stories of impact, issue, inspiration and innovation, reaches large local, national and global audiences across channels and platforms. For more information visit www.techbookonline.com.

Source: TBO Inc®

Twitter: @therealTBOInc

Facebook: /therealTBOInc

©2016 All Rights Reserved.

#####

300 S Broad St, Philadelphia PA 19102 Center City
Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,